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Finally, a clean & modern Divi Child Theme using great typography and imagery. Class all the way.

Features

Clean Typography

Josefin features the Josefin & Merriweather Google Fonts. The styling has been meticulously set to fit the aesthetics of the theme, providing a relaxing reading experience.

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Styled Counters

We’ve taken extra care in styling the number counter feature Divi offers. We’ve included dark & light background options. Showcase your stats in style with the Josefin Child Theme.

Twitter Widget

We’ve utilized and styled the Rotating Tweets Plugin by Martin Tod. Display your tweets elegantly using this plugin and the Josefin Child Theme. We’ve included an instructional video on how to set this up.

Stunning Imagery

A photo is worth a thousand words. Parallax backgrounds combined with great use of whitespace allow the focus to be on your beautiful images. We’ve also styled a masonry layout as an option for your images.

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Styled Form

We’ve also taken extra care in styling the contact form in Divi. We’ve included dark & light background options. Make your contact form stand out with the Josefin Child Theme.

Instagram Widget

We’ve utilized and styled the WP Instagram Widget by Scott Evans. Display your Instagram photos elegantly using this plugin and the Josefin Child Theme. We’ve included an instructional video on how to set this up.

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Extra Animations

Divi comes with some nice animation options. We’ve added additional animation classes you can apply to your sections and modules. We’ve included an instructional video on how to use these animations.

Features Grid

Easily build a features grid with Josefin. We’ve created an instructional video with links to the CSS and a Divi Layout files. Import the layout into your site with a single click.

Superior Support

Your purchase comes with our superior support. Email us and we’ll respond to you as soon as possible. We also have video tutorials showing how to implement different features of the theme.

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5 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle by Year-End

5 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle by Year-End

A task without a deadline is just wishful thinking.

Sometimes, you can get away with procrastinating. If you never get around to alphabetizing your spices, no one’s life will change. But putting off some tasks could have a huge impact on loved ones.

The close of the year is a good time to set some firm deadlines to make sure you won’t leave a financial mess for people you love if you unexpectedly die or become incapacitated. Consider putting these items on your to-do list with a Dec. 31 due date:

1. Check your beneficiaries

If you need convincing that updating beneficiaries is important, consider the case of David Egelhoff, a Washington state man who died two months after his divorce was final in 1994. Because he had not changed his beneficiaries, his life insurance proceeds and pension plan were paid to his ex-wife rather than his children from a previous marriage. The children sued, and the case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled in 2001 that the beneficiary designations had to be honored.

You’re typically prompted to name beneficiaries when you sign up for a 401(k) or other retirement account. Beneficiaries also are usually required when you buy annuities or life insurance. You often can check and change beneficiaries online, or you may need to call the company to request the appropriate form.

2. Review pay-on-death resignations

You may not have been required to name beneficiaries when you opened your checking account or a non-retirement investment account. Instead, financial institutions may offer a “pay on death” option. This allows you to name a beneficiary who can receive the money directly. Otherwise, the account typically has to go through probate, the legal procedure to distribute your property after you die.

Some states also have “transfer on death” options for vehicles and even real estate. Like pay-on-death accounts, these options allow you to pass property directly to heirs without the potential delays and costs of probate.

Beneficiaries can be added to vehicle registrations in Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas, Vermont and Virginia, according to self-help legal site Nolo. To add or change a beneficiary, you apply for a certificate of car ownership with the beneficiary form.

Transfer-on-death deeds for real estate are available in Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming, according to legal site Nolo. To add or change a beneficiary, the deed must be submitted to the appropriate county recorder.

3. Update insurers — and your heirs

Insurers usually don’t pay out life insurance proceeds until someone files a claim. But far too often, heirs are unaware that the money exists. A Consumer Reports investigation in 2013 found about $1 billion in life insurance proceeds waiting to be claimed.

Updating your contact information with your insurer also may help prevent policies from lapsing. I just heard from a reader who lost her long-term care coverage because she’d moved, forgotten to tell her insurer and failed to notice she hadn’t been billed. Many insurers will allow you to name someone who can be notified if a payment is overdue or they can’t find you. You’ll want to keep the contact information for those back-up people updated with the company, as well.

4. Visit your safe deposit box

If you forget to pay your annual fee and your bank can’t find you, after a few years your safe deposit box will be drilled and the contents turned over to the state. Photos and documents could be destroyed and family heirlooms sold at auction. Visit your box once a year to make sure your payments and contact details are current. Leave clear instructions with your executor or your heirs about where to find the box and its keys.

5. Create or revise powers of attorney

Powers of attorney allow others to make financial and health care decisions for you if you become incapacitated. If you don’t have these documents, or the designated people have died or are otherwise unavailable, your loved ones may have to go to court to take over. The expense and delay can add trauma at an already difficult time. Spare everyone that pain by naming a backup person or two and reviewing the documents every year to make sure the people named can still serve.

A previous version of this column omitted Texas and Nebraska from the list of states that allow transfer-on-death real estate deeds and erroneously included Michigan.

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by The Associated Press.

The article 5 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle by Year-End originally appeared on NerdWallet.

What to Do If Your Parents Need Financial Help

What to Do If Your Parents Need Financial Help

Most parents in the U.S. provide some sort of financial support to their adult children, multiple surveys have found. But often, financial aid goes the other way.

A 2015 survey by TD Ameritrade found 13% of American adults provided financial support to a parent. Millennials were far more likely than older generations to report they were helping their folks. Of people born between 1981 and 1996, 19% helped support their parents, compared with 13% of Gen Xers (1965 to 1980) and 8% of baby boomers (1946 to 1964).

Sometimes the money is provided happily, or at least without resentment, by those following cultural norms or personal conviction that they owe it to their parents. Other times, financial aid to parents is a source of tension — between parent and adult child, among siblings and between partners.

Certified financial planner Austin A. Frye had no idea when he married his wife four decades ago that they would one day support her parents. The older couple, now in their 80s, cover their day-to-day expenses with a union pension and Social Security. Frye and his wife cover unexpected expenses and travel for her parents, Frye says, and also pay $15,000 a year for a long-term care policy.

Frye says that though he’s happy to be in a position to help his in-laws, he still wishes they had saved money for their retirement.

“They just spent what they made,” Frye says. “They didn’t really plan.”

Certified financial planner Kashif A. Ahmed, on the other hand, comes from a Pakistani culture where younger people get into arguments about who will have the honor of caring for an older relative. Ahmed said he needed a spreadsheet to coordinate the dozens of relatives who volunteered to help his great-grandparents in their final illnesses.

Ahmed invited his mother to move in with him after his father died in 2001. His wife, Simona, an economist who grew up with similar values in Romania, supported the move, and Ahmed’s mother is helping to raise their four daughters, ages 6 to 16.

Ahmed says financial advisers from other cultures often have trouble grasping the deep sense of obligation. He’s heard peers criticize clients who aren’t saving enough for retirement or are neglecting other goals while supporting parents, saying the clients don’t “get it.”

“I’ll say, ‘No, no, no. You don’t get it,’ ” Ahmed says.

Balancing competing goals is what financial planning is all about. If you’re supporting a parent or think you may in the future, the following steps could help make the balancing act a bit easier.

Talk to your partner. If you’re married or in a committed relationship, it helps to get on the same page about how much you’re willing and able to give. Brainstorm different scenarios, such as emergency expenses (how much can you give, and what constitutes an emergency?) or long-term care (can you provide care in your home or help pay for in-home or nursing care?). If you’re not clear what you can afford, a consultation with a financial planner could help. If you don’t have a partner, talking to a trusted friend or a financial planner can help you clarify what you can offer and when.

Talk with your parents. Just over half of the people supporting parents in the TD Ameritrade survey had ever talked with them about it. Financial planners say that understanding the parents’ financial situation can help you prepare, and might also provide an opportunity for you to reduce their need for your help. You could help them budget, give them a session with a financial planner or check Benefits.gov for assistance programs. You also can let them know how much help you can afford to provide.

Rope in your siblings, if you have them. Even if they can’t contribute financially, they may be able to help in other ways: running errands, taking parents to the doctor, handling bill paying and other paperwork, or providing respite care.

Take care of yourself. You may have to delay retirement, buying a house or having kids to support your parents. Many people do, according to the survey. But you should have a plan to eventually reach your own goals. Unlike your parents, you may have only yourself to rely on when you’re older.

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by The Associated Press.

The article What to Do If Your Parents Need Financial Help originally appeared on NerdWallet.

Medical Bills Plague Millennials; These Tips May Be the Cure

Medical Bills Plague Millennials; These Tips May Be the Cure

Chrystal McKay knew enough about medical care costs that she skipped the ambulance ride after a car accident. A friend drove her to the emergency room.

That saved her one bill, but she faces another for more than $20,000 after her ER visit. The 29-year-old Stockton, California, woman must balance paying her debt with getting care for a sprained shoulder that may need surgery: “I have to weigh the pros and cons. I’m already $20,000 in debt, and any more treatment will just put me more in debt.”

Uninsured at the time and facing a bill she doesn’t know how to handle, McKay finds herself in a position familiar to many in her generation. If she can’t cover the cost, her bill may wind up in collections.

No matter your age or insurance status, there are ways to make medical debt more manageable, whether you just got the bill or it’s already in collections.

Medical collections peak in late 20s

Young adults incur medical collections debt at a higher rate than older age groups, according to a study published in Health Affairs, a health policy journal.

The report looked at 2016 data from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Consumer Credit Panel. It found that the frequency of medical debt in collections peaked at 11.3 percent, for people age 27, and stayed near that level until the mid-40s — even though medical spending in general is low for people in their 20s. The median amount in collections also peaked at age 27, at $684. In contrast, people in their 60s had higher rates of medical spending but fewer medical collections.

That puts millennials — those born 1981-1996 — in the crosshairs. “There are a number of things that add up that make younger adults more prone to this kind of debt,” says economist Ben Ippolito, one of the study’s authors.

Among them:

  • Less earning power: Americans ages 25 to 34 had a median income of $36,664 in 2017, according to the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey.
  • Lack of insurance: Just under 20% of millennials in their late 20s and early 30s were uninsured, the highest rate seen in the Health Affairs report.
  • Mobility: Younger people tend to move more frequently, increasing the chances for lost bills leading to collections.

McKay’s income took a hit when she had to quit her dog-grooming position as a result of her injuries; she expects to make about $30,000 for the year. And she was recently approved for state-run health insurance. But insurance doesn’t entirely shield people from medical collections. The study found that “most medical debts are relatively modest in size, which means they could be incurred before the insured person meets their deductible.”

Uncertain how to cover medical bills

McKay made a GoFundMe page to drum up some money but has only about $1,300 so far. However, she has the right idea in trying to take some type of action, even if the bill seems overwhelming.

If your bill isn’t paid for several months, the debt could go into collections, which can drag down your credit score and make you appear riskier to potential creditors.

“I find, by and large, people have no clue about how to handle a bill,” says Adria Gross, a medical bill advocate in New York. In nearly 30 years of experience, working at one point for an insurer and now negotiating bills on behalf of consumers, she’s seen the confusion medical bills can cause.

“First thing people need to do if they can’t afford a bill is call their provider and see if they can negotiate it. And the provider probably can reduce what you owe,” Gross says. She advises having details of your income and how much you can pay at hand, to help you make your case.

Other options for handling your medical debt include:

  • Pursue a payment plan: Ask the provider to break up your bill into a number of payments to cover the cost over time. If they refuse, you can create your own by transferring the debt to a 0% APR credit card (though you’ll need good credit to qualify for one).
  • Hire a professional: Medical bill advocates may be able to negotiate your bill down to a fraction of the original amount.
  • Try DIY settlement: You may be able to negotiate a lump sum settlement on your own, especially if the debt is already in collections. The creditor may accept your offer to pay less than you owe rather than risk receiving no payment at all.

This article was written by NerdWallet and was originally published by The Associated Press. 

The article Medical Bills Plague Millennials; These Tips May Be the Cure originally appeared on NerdWallet.

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